Nesting Boxes and BAD NEWS

I’ll start off with the good stuff.  My son and I added nesting boxes to our chicken coop!  This is something I’ve wanted to do for a while since this coop didn’t have a separate nesting area where the eggs would stay clean (AKA away from the roosting area).

This post is more of an update than DIY instructions, but I will point you in the direction of some great instructions for the project.  There is a blog called Coop Thoughts and you can find their nesting box instructions by clicking HERE.  They are very easy to follow, and the only supplies we bought were a sheet of plywood, some deck screws, and hinges.  Below are a couple of pictures of the finished nesting box addition (before priming & painting).  I really like this design because it will be very easy to clean out and access eggs.

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Okay, now for the bad news.  Just a couple of days after finishing the nesting box addition, I came home from work and looked out back and noticed something was wrong.  I quickly put shoes back on and ran out to the chicken run.  I found a couple of dead chickens.  I looked around some more and found more and more dead chickens.  All of them in the chicken run and coops were dead.  The only surviving chicken was the one who flies out of the fenced area (despite her wing clipping) and roosts in a tree every night.  Her rebellious nature saved her life.

I did find some paw prints, which look like they’re from a dog.  The dog managed to find a seam in our fence and pulled it back enough to squeeze through.  After doing the damage, it apparently couldn’t find its way back out until after several attempts to dig its way out.

It’s been a rough fall for us this year.  We lost the pick-up truck (engine blew out), lost bees, and now lost chickens.  I hope this is the end of our unlucky streak.

5 comments for “Nesting Boxes and BAD NEWS

  1. Michelle
    December 3, 2015 at 10:38 am

    Cheri
    So sorry to hear of your troubling events. Please know we are praying that times get better for you.

    • Cheri
      Cheri
      January 4, 2016 at 5:37 am

      Thank you so much for the encouragement. 🙂 Prayers are always appreciated!

  2. Penny Powell
    February 8, 2016 at 12:18 pm

    Oh my goodness, I so remember about 4 years ago I got my first flock and low and behold a raccoon found his/her way in and killed almost all of my chickens. I was so upset, crying. I had named my hens the sweetest southern names and they were the best sexlink hens you could have asked for. They let you pick them up and were just so friendly,
    I’ve make lots of improvements to the house/yard since then. I’ve had a few more flocks none as sweet as those though. Dogs can be tough to discourage. My husband and son actually buried the fence underground, placed a perimeter of rr ties, and a perimeter of cement block to discourage such digging.
    I’ve currently got RIR’s now and their about 8 months old and have started laying pretty well. I have about 15 hens and 1 rooster. So far I’ve done a couple of hatching 14 eggs altogether. We’ll see how that works out.
    Some things you’ve just got to keep at and figure out. My own dog recently got one of my hens and can’t even begin to tell you the disappointment I felt with her because she has had all kinds of training and I was right there when she got the hen. It killed me. So I feel your pain.
    You could have some of my new chicks if you lived close by-take care

    • Cheri
      Cheri
      February 9, 2016 at 7:56 am

      Thank you, Penny! Keeping animals comes with its challenges, large and small, that’s for sure. I am excited to start a new flock this spring. 🙂 As soon as the snow melts we’ll get to work on the fence. I think I’m going to get Australorps, as they’ve been the nicest breed for us so far. In the past we just had a mashup of whatever breeds we could get for free or cheap. 🙂

    • Cheri
      Cheri
      April 5, 2016 at 6:13 pm

      Sorry I’m so late to reply! Thank you so much for your encouragement. Keeping animals comes with risks and the potential for disappointment. It can be hard to keep going. I’ll be posting an update shortly on what we’ve decided to do this spring. 🙂

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